A Trip To The Movies: Review – “Eden” 7.4.15

I thought of starting this review out to reflect something I said awhile back in another. I started by saying something to the effect of “it should be by way of some sort of miracle that I happened to stumble upon this film”. And that’s the first thought that entered into my brain after the house lights came on after having seen Mia Hansen-Love’s (the French 34-year old writer/director who’s married to a little known guy by the name of Olivier Assayas) latest film. All I really knew was that it had been selected, screened at, and opened to quite a bit of positive praise at many of this past year’s most prestigious film festivals. That and it touted itself as being THE most quintessential film about the electronic music scene to date.

The film was co-written by writer/director Love’s real life brother, Sven, about his experiences as a successful music DJ/Producer who practically lived through what many electronic music fans would undoubtably agree was the hey day of electronic music, particularly that of the House/Disco scene that was coming out of Europe in the early to mid nineties and lasted for the next 20 years. It revolves around its central character, Paul (Felix de Givry, in what was my first introduction to him as an actor), a late teenager in early nineties Paris, France. Paul and his friends are stuck in a time where the electronic music scene, particularly in Europe, where the music seemed to really be taking off with artists like the Godfathers of House music, Daft Punk (who are featured regularly throughout the film as fictionalized versions of themselves and in the film’s soundtrack). Paul and his friends live, breathe, eat, and sleep electronic music. The scene is going through what some may call a rebirth or revitalization, and Paul and his fellow music friends seem to live for any single chance they can get to attend any of Paris’ many underground electronic events that take place each and every weekend. It’s not long before Paul and one of his fellow electronic music fans start to aspire to be on the other side of the dance floor and become DJ’s themselves. He forms a duo called “Cheers” and their events start to spread throughout Europe via word-of-mouth and ultimately to the States. The film goes on to explore these two decade plus years of Paul and his mates as they go on to become to be internationally recognized figures while also giving us a complete and comprehensive overview of what their experiences were like, the highs and lows, and trials and tribulations of being successful DJ’s at the time when the scene was exploding and experiencing a burgeoning renaissance.

What can I say about this film other than it was nothing short of both incredible and astonishing. As a devoted lover of electronic music this film felt like the ultimate love letter to not only myself, but to legions of fans around the world as it just could possibly be the most accurate and comprehensive look at a pivotal moment in history within the genre. Then there’s the character of Paul (played remarkably by Felix de Givry) who literally grows up before our eyes. From his young days as a late teenager transitioning into adulthood in his twenties, to the 20 year period that followed where he immerses himself into the world of electronic music. At times I got hints of Richard Linklater’s “Boyhood” as we follow Paul for on his 2 decade plus journey through the music that runs through every moral fiber of his body. We see how his commitment to his passion affects his family, his continuous failed relationships (one of which is with the great American actress Greta Gerwig, who plays a small but important role in Paul’s life), to his struggles with cocaine addiction. And what becomes an underlying subplot that I personally could relate to in being  so passionate about something that it becomes difficult to break away from it. Change doesn’t come easy for any of us, and in the context of this film, neither does it for Paul. As the world seems to grow and change as time goes by, so do the people around Paul, except his commitment to his love and work doesn’t really  allow for much in terms of personal growth. This was just one in a film that explored a number of many other brilliantly explored subplots. Making Paul’s rise to an internationally renowned DJ/Producer feel like an expert character study of a man that’s so committed and dedicated to his life’s work. That when the party starts to fade away and the scene begins to change, like anything in life, Paul isn’t quite sure how to change along with it. This all bolstered by an excellent soundtrack of House (or as Paul would call it “Garage” music – i.e. House + Disco) music as well as some more contemporary electro tracks. As a music fan overall but especially an electronic music aficionado, this is the best collection of songs put to screen from the genre since Danny Boyle’s “Trainspotting” (1997) soundtrack almost two decades ago. Lastly, what I’ll end on saying is this – what I love most about the art of film is when you can see part of yourself mirrored in it and come to a greater understanding about who you really are through the eyes of another director’s lens. And it becomes intimately personal. Then you know you’ve just lay witness to something spectacular. Which is exactly how I felt walking out of this film. The film’s message to me was clear and something that all of us either have or could relate to at some point, which is letting go of the person we saw ourselves as in our youth and accepting the permanent person that we’ve become. It’s a cathartic, self-revelatory, and utterly rewarding experience. And a film that ranks up there with this year’s best right alongside “Ex Machina” which should bode well and wind up as a serious top 5 contender come my end of the year best of list.

[A-]

Review: ‘Bastards’ 11.7.14

I deliberately chose to revisit this film for 2 important reasons. One, because it currently holds a spot on my top 10 films of 2014, and two, because I never got around to writing a review for it. Paris born writer/director Claire Denis has just about as diverse of a résumé as almost any other international filmmaker that I can think of. She first caught the eye of the filmmaking landscape with her debut breakthrough film – 1988’s “Chocolat”. She made quite a few films throughout the nineties, all of which admittedly I haven’t seen. But starting with around the turn of the century is about when I caught on and got interested in her work. Her incredibly controversial body-horror picture “Trouble Every Day” (2001) was my real first introduction to her. A film that stands out as one of the pioneering films of the French New Extremity movement. That film resonated with me so much to the point that I still think about it often when talking about my conversations on film. Then
my next taste of Denis was with 2008’s “35 Shots of Rum”. A rich, poignant family drama about a bi-racial daughter and her recently widowed father. Then only to be swept up once again the following year with 2009’s “White Material”. A film about a young woman trying to stay alive in a war-torn post-colonial Africa. One thing that stands out at least to me in relation to Denis’ work is not only her ability to make such a diversity of different films within her body of work, but ones that are always risk taking and seem to challenge her audience. Having really liked the 4 previous films I had seen of hers, mixed in with the fact that it received a Un Certain Regard nomination at last year’s Cannes Film Festival I knew this was one I wasn’t going to miss.

The film starts right off the bat with a suicide. The man’s wife is questioned and believes she knows why her husband went to such lengths. We flash forward a year, and the story introduces us to Marco (the great French actor Vincent Lindon) who moves into the apartment building of his now widowed sister and dead brother-in-law. Marco also takes an interest in one of the other building residents. A rich heiress whose husband was the business partner of his late brother-in-law. A man who Marco feels is responsible for his death and the suffering and financial debt he put his sister in. Though Marco seems to have quite a fascination with the man’s wife, and the two soon develop an affair. Meanwhile his grieving sister’s daughter goes missing and is found brutalized after an accident in the hospital. Marco’s focus then shifts to finding out who could have possibly done such a thing to his niece while still continuing his affair with the man’s wife who he think’s is responsible for his dead brother-in-law. Did her husband really have something to do with it? Why did his niece get into the accident and wind up in the hospital? Are the two interconnected in some way? This is what the film goes on to explore in its second half.

What can I say other than I absolutely loved this movie. And consider it to be Denis’ best film to date. Given that Denis is now in her late sixties and even though probably has a few films left in her, it almost felt like a culmination piece in relation to the rest of her body of work that I’ve seen. It’s a noirish and nightmarish vision that’s shrouded in mystery. Like some of her more controversial pieces (ala “Trouble Every Day”) it’s a grand statement on the dark side of humanity and the depths to which people out there can go. Except it’s not intentionally nihilistic like the films of her other French counterpart Gasper Noe. Denis is much more of a psychological director whose movies contain quite a bit of mystery. It’s reminiscent of films like George C. Scott’s “Hardcore” (1978), David Lynch’s trilogy of films about mistaken identity – “Lost Highway” (1997), 2001’s “Mulholland Drive, and “Inland Empire” (2007), alas mixed in with a taste of Joel Schumacher’s “8MM” (1999). It’s incredibly dark, erotic, and perverse much like those films were. Also, like most of Denis’ work she seems more interested in really challenging the audience to think more than anything. Which who anybody that knows me knows how much I value that aspect in terms of how I view film. Lastly, is the film’s last act which contains some unabashedly truths about the innately evil and unspeakable horrors of the dark side of humanity. Totally taking me by storm and one which had me sitting there not knowing exactly what to do with myself once the credits rolled. This is an unforgettable film, but only for people who like their films to be both dark and challenging. If this sounds like your cup of tea, well, then there’s really not a better foreign film I can recommend to you that I’ve seen all year. This is one that currently stands high on my list of the top 10 films of 2014. One in which I’m pretty confident in saying that I think should hold out and remain there by year’s end.

[A-]