A Trip To The Movies – “A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night” 2.28.15

I’ll just flat-out start by saying this was probably the most highly original, inventive, and exciting film I’ve seen to have come along in a while. In fact, had it of come out last year, it wouldn’t most likely have, it would have, landed a coveted spot on my “best films of the year-end” list. What’s so interesting about this film is that it kind of came out of nowhere. In fact, I don’t even remember how I heard about it. Since I really don’t read any film news/review anymore that’s not where I took notice of it. I do however somewhat regularly look at cumulative scores and saw that this one was graded rather highly. Then I saw the name of the title and it piqued my interest. And merely based on that and that alone, plus seeing a tagline that it was “the first Iranian Vampire Western”, I thought to myself well at the very least this sounds interesting. What I “didn’t” know while watching it is that it’s an American film. Even though all of the characters in the film are Iranian actors who speak in the Persian language and it’s written and directed by an Iranian-American filmmaker Ana Lily Amirpour who has lived in America for practically her whole life. Which is ironic because the film feels totally foreign, and different from just about any other American film I’ve seen, bringing us into a poor desolate land known as “Bad City” which feels like a world far, far, away when in actuality it was shot right here in the States in Bakersfield, California.

The film opens with an old man, Hossein, a heroin addict who seems to be at the end of his rope in terms of his addiction. The only saving grace in his life is the assistance of his son, Arash, who is at his father’s beckoning call because like most sons (at least that I know) does just about anything to save his father. Anyways, Hossein owes quite a bit of money to the local town drug dealer, Saeed (whose look seems to be taken straight from Ninja of the rave/rap African group Die Antwoord). Saeed takes one of Hossein’s prize possessions much to the chagrin of Arash. Saeed seems to be the focus of the story, at least for about the first quarter of the film, along with his hooker, junkie, drug partner Atti. But one night Saeed happens to stumble across a young woman, called simply “The Girl”, that follows him to his apartment, which in that point in the story it shifts gears completely and this “girl” or young woman of whom I speak of becomes the central focus of the story. What’s even more notable is that said woman is a vampire, who goes around town wreaking havoc but does so with a conscience. She seems to only prey on the weak, sick, and degenerate members of society. It is by this chance encounter between the town drug dealer Saeed and the girl whom Arash crosses paths with, which involves the major subplot of the story, one that mirrors the one from “Let The Right One In” (2008) and the American version “Let Me In” (2010). But don’t be fooled, besides the reference, it’s undeniably unique enough (not to mention they’re adults and not children) to separate itself from those films. It is through their relationship that the rest of the story unfolds, and all of the characters previously mentioned are reintroduced back into (or out of, depending on how you want to look at it) the story.

As you can probably already tell by my comments at the beginning of my review I absolutely loved just about every aspect of this film. There is just so much I want to talk about that I feel like I would be doing it a great injustice to leave any of them out. But for the sake of not writing a novel, I will try to keep it to just the key elements of the film in which I really liked. First off was its stunning black-and-white cinematography. I’ve always thought a film is better when shot in black-and-white. As it takes the viewer away from the color palette and allows the images to speak for themselves. In this film this approach works brilliantly as it’s maybe the best looking black-and-white film since as far back as I can remember. This format also gives this chilling, noirish tale a look of authenticity that works perfectly given the content of the story. It’s also about as stylishly shot from a design angle and has a look and sometimes feel of an old Jim Jarmusch film (especially in the hipster department). The cool, sleek, and cold feel and tone matches the images on-screen magnificently. Another thing I think is important to point out, is that for a movie with this much style (Quentin Tarantino came to mind for me at times) it’s also loaded with substance. The central story and the many shifts in character arcs make it completely and utterly compelling from start to finish. There’s also a great “meta-ness” to the whole affair. While it certainly is a horror film at heart it also combines elements of film noir, westerns, comedy, drama, and romance. All genres that are balanced quite well considering how dense of a film it winds up being. The last thing I think that’s important to point out is that there is scene after scene of sheer beauty that seem like they have the potential to be iconic movie history (an example would be the dancing scene between John Travolta and Uma Thurman in “Pulp Fiction” (1995) – but imagine not just one but several scenes like that). Which had me looking up the screen with a shit eating grin for practically the entire film, so engaged by the style, story, and characters that I had to pass up a bathroom break in fear that I was going to miss whatever was next. This is hands down the most unique, stylish, and fresh take that breathes new life into what is otherwise a tired genre, that being the vampire film. It’s only two months into the year and this one has already secured a spot on my top 10 list of 2015.

[A-]

Review: ‘Rob The Mob’ 9.30.14

 

Every now and then I find myself in the mood for a bit more lighter fare than what I’m normally used to. Since I’m so used to constantly being let down by comedies maybe more than any other genre, I rarely take the leap of faith needed to check one out unless it comes from a recommendation from someone whose opinion I trust. Though with this movie I more or less just came across it. No one told me about it,  I didn’t read anything on it, nor did I see it advertised anywhere. However I did see that it got some fairly decent favorable scores on a couple of movie sites I check out occasionally. So I thought I’d give it a shot. That and I really like Michael Pitt. My first introduction to the talented young actor was in the American version of Michael Haneke’s “Funny Games” (2007) where he did an excellent job playing one of two young men who terrorize an upper class family. He’s gone on to do some strong work in both the TV series “Boardwalk Empire” and played a very small bit part; yet a memorable one, in 2012’s “Seven Psychopaths”. I don’t know if it’s the Leonardo DiCaprio quasi look-alikeness that I like about him or if I geniunely think the guy’s got chops (probably the latter). But really any movie that looks remotely interesting where he’s cast as the lead I will likely check out. Which was the case with this one. Plus, I heard it was a “crime comedy”. So I was hoping for something like Jonathan Demme’s “Married To The Mob” (1988). I also happened to notice comparisons to both “Bonnie and Clyde” and “Goodfellas” on the poster. But knowing very well that those quotes are usually written in hyperbole I still figured oh well what the hell I’ll give it a shot. Hopefully it will surprise me.

It’s a simple enough setup. One that’s based on a true story and took place in New York City in the early 1990’s. We’re first introduced to Tommy (Pitt). Tommy is a degenerate small time crook with a crack cocaine problem who is in love with a girl who more or less is his mirror image. He sticks up small businesses who they themselves hardly make any money for a living. We’re not talking about the sharpest tool in the shed here so it’s only inevitable that he’s going to get caught. And does. The film then cuts to 14 years later when Tommy is released from prison to his girlfriend, who is played suprisingly well by an actress who I hadn’t heard of up to this point named Nina Arianda. These two lovers attempt to “go straight” but because of financial reasons are forced to go back to their old ways. He devises a not so smart idea of robbing the Italian Social Clubs in the city, many of whom have Mob affiliations. After a string of hold-ups, Tommy stumbles upon one club whose boss “Big Al” (played by the always serviceable Andy Garcia) finds out and puts a bounty on his head. Though Tommy comes across something the FBI desperately needs. That and the FBI looks at what Tommy’s doing as what they refer to as a kind of “public service”. The FBI’s “hey better him than us” attitude provides for some pretty solid laughs. Almost as if the FBI gives him free reign to do whatever he wants as long as he’s robbing all of the local town crooks. So in doing so, Tommy begins to misgude both the FBI and the Mob, all while he and his girlfriend start to become almost local celebrities, and attract the attention of a reporter (Ray Romano, who like Garcia, is serviceable in the role). Both entities soon start to tighten up. Especially because the FBI is honing in on Garcia’s character who is a well known big time crime boss. One that in his aging years is trying to go straight and any opposing forces to this will be dealt with accordingly. While Tommy appears to be having a nice run, his time also seems to be running out.

This movie functions fairly well as a whole, even if at times it did feel a bit contrived and cliched. But I think that’s slightly to be expected given a movie like this. The script is mildly clever, and the actors (especially Pitt and in a come out of nowhere and very funny Griffen Dunne) all do a pretty good job in their respective roles. There are quite a few laughs, particularly in the scenes involving Pitt sticking up the Mob. Along with an effective ending that felt like something out of a Hollywood fairy tale that ends tragically. All of these things allow me to give it decent marks. Though as the film develops, specifically near the end, it grows increasingly more and more prepostorous. There’s also that flashback thing movies do only in this case some of it is intertwined with real footage. Making the fake and real flashback scenes slightly difficult to discern from each other. Had they of just left that device out entirely I thought it would have been a lot more effective. But, even still, there’s enough to like here that makes it a worthwhile experience. Especially if you like small, indepedent, charming, lite fair comedies. Just don’t expect anything you’re going to want to write home about.

Grade: B-