Weekend Recap (Part 1): A New-To-DVD Release – “Tales From The Grim Sleeper” + My First of Two Trips To The Movies – “About Elly” (6/5-6/6)

It was exciting news to me when I heard that documentarian Nick Broomfield had a new film out.Having alfeady seen many of his previous documentaries and liked; the Kurt Cobian/Courtney Love documentary – “Kurt and Courtney” (1998), his probing look into the life, work, and deaths of the Notorious B.I.G and Tupac in “Biggie and Tupac” (2002), and finally, one that he is probably the most known for – “Aileen: Life and Death of a Serial Killer” (2003) about the trial of the Florida serial killer Aileen Wuornos which that same year later whose story was made into and released as a feature film in the Charlize Theron Oscar-winning “Monster”.

His newest documentary, commissioned by HBO films, “Tales of The Grim Sleeper” (which first aired on HBO in late April and continues to weekly, so get out your TIVO) brings the British documentarian to Los Angeles to try to uncover the truth about the infamous case of the serial killer known as the “Grim Sleeper”, otherwise known as Lonnie Franklin, who terrorized one small corner of the city for almost 25 years and is on trial for the murder of 10 women, but who was believed to be responsible for the death and or various other crimes against 170 more. The question the documentary poses is how could a man, who at the time of his arrest at 60+ years of age, manage to go on a killing spree for twenty five years without having ever been investigated into in all of that time? However many people in the very poor section of his lower, working class neighborhood (if you even want to call it that – 50% of its inhabitants are unemployed) and moreover why almost the entire community knew about it for most of his long 25-year run but never spoke up about it. And in turn asks questions about this section of L.A.’s local police force and why they stayed away and turned a blind eye for so many years to what was actually going on, while on top of that asking us as viewers should they have even cared. You see, Lonnie Franklin aka “The Grim Sleeper” focused solely on capturing, having sex with, and most likely killing young women, most of whom were prostitutes and addicted to crack cocaine. At the risk of sounding apathetic and for someone who values human life, no matter what their place and function within society is, are we talking about “disposable” lives here? That’s just one of the many questions the documentary poses (indirectly as it certainly doesn’t take the stance that the killings were somehow warranted). In typical Broomfield fashion this is another rather impressive, though bleak and at times difficult to watch viewing as we hear countless interviews from ex-prostitutes who encountered the man but somehow managed to get away. If you, like me, are into the “crime” documentary genre, this is something you should eat up as it’s thought-provoking, gripping, and does what only the best documentaries do – show a 2-sided argument that raises many questions, those of which you should be pondering over well after its final credits have rolled. [B+]

Next up we have the latest film, “About Elly” (or shall I say “re-release”, as the film was originally made in 2009 but not released theatrically in the States until just recently), by one of the world’s most renowned filmmakers – Iranian born Asghar Farhadi, who wowed critics, audiences and the Academy alike with his Oscar winning 2011 Best Foreign Language film – “A Separation”. A film many critics consider to be the best foreign film of the past 15 years (and rightfully so). I was almost equally impressed by his follow up, 2013’s “The Past”, another film about the devastating effects on what pivotal life decisions can have on all others involved in them. What I enjoy so much about Farhadi’s work, which admittedly was limited to just the two prior aforementioned films, is that they bring back the true essence of “family drama” and everything that the genre used to do so well. In fact, before being introduced to Farhadi I can honestly say the last high quality family drama that probeed into similar territory, which also happens to be one of my favorite films of all time, was way back in 2001 with the release of Todd Field’s Academy Award-winning “In The Bedroom”. A brilliant and breathtaking film with a deep emotional core that I find myself revisiting almost yearly in the past 15 years or so. Like, “In The Bedroom”, Farhadi’s films, again with the addition of his newest (or again shall I say re-release) mostly exists inside its own universe, tackling a single act and the tragic set of events that follow. As said events transpire in each film each of his characters are revealed, motivations, and agendas are exposed. But many of them are decisions that are steeped in moral values, ethics, and each person’s beliefs, many deeply rooted in a cultural code which permeates throughout each of Farhadi’s films. “About Elly” draws comparisons to “A Separation” and “The Past” in this respect, but rather than focus on a single family, as the other films do, here we find him exploring these same themes but within a much larger group of people consisting of college colleagues who visit the seashore and bring along one of the women’s children’s teachers, the titular character, Elly, who winds up going missing after a critical incident that takes place, and in its examination of events that transpire following, shows the effects it has on each of its characters. Like with all of Farhadi’s films, it depicts how we as people, tend to want place blame on any one other than ourselves, and shows how this can have devastating effects on everyone involved. It’s another impressive, yet minor addition to the Farhadi oeuvre, and while at times it felt a bit slight and overlong, it always was engaging and compelling enough to allow me to recommend it. Particularly because of the flawless acting on display and deep themes in which it chooses to explore. Yet, as someone who considers themselves to be a huge admirer of the director’s work, overall if felt a bit more like a precursor piece to his more recent work, the latter of which ranks among the best that international cinema has to offer. [B]

A Trip To The Movies: Review – “Mad Max: Fury Road 3D” 5.17.15

I’m not sure how many directors have gone on to make a reboot or remake of their original films. Then comes in writer/director George Miller, who, in 1979, made the original “Mad Max” (1979), and its subsequent sequels – 1981’s “Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior” and 1986’s “Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome” (1986). Here we are thirty years later, and Miller presents us with his 4th installment of the series. I have to admit, when I first heard about this film I was very reluctant, as I’m not usually one for remakes, redos, reboots, or whatever you want to call them. Then I found out that it was going to be helmed by the original writer/director of the series, and after seeing a trailer way back in January after “American Sniper” I thought to myself “wow, this looks like something that has some serious potential”. I also thought either they did a really good job with the trailer and that it looked like it could be the next great action movie, or it could wind up like something more akin to Miller’s 3rd installment – a film held sacred but not by anyone I know other than its deepest admires of the series – “Beyond Thunderdome”. Which after the groundbreaking innovative first and second installments within the series, frankly put, should never have been made. What also intrigued me which I don’t usually follow was the rumor mill from the set – stars Charlize Theron and Tom Hardy were at each others’ throats, Hardy was reportedly very difficult to work with on set (not the first time I’ve heard this), and that the filming process took much longer than usual for a film to complete. However, after having recently revisited the first and second installments in my anticipation for the newest, that and its great reception coming out of Cannes last week and glowing reviews that came in at the end of last week, all but pretty much sealed the deal for me. My anticipation for it plus the bar were set high.

“Mad Max: Fury Road” starts off with a bit of back story of shots in black and white, similar to how “The Road Warrior” did, providing us with some background into how the film’s setting of a future-esque Australian desert wasteland came to be. Also, similar to “The Road Warrior”, natural resources are scarce, particularly that of gasoline. A philanthropist by the name of “Immortan Joe” employs a young woman named Furiosa (played by Charlize Theron – more on her to come) to take an armored big rig truck across the barren Australian desert to collect gasoline. Meanwhile the newest and first Max in the quadrilogy to feature anyone other than Mel Gibson, played by the always wonderful Tom Hardy, is caught in middle of the whole thing and is taken prisoner by the “War Boys”, Joe’s army, and is imprisoned to act as a blood donor for one of the War Boys (Nicholas Hoult – the young boy, now obviously much older and almost unrecognizable, from 2002’s “About A Boy”). The action really picks up when Furiosa veers off course with Joe’s five wives on board, setting off a spectacular chase scene (or shall I say chase movie) with other contributing gangs following their trail. Max is eventually freed and steals Furiosa’s rig, but the truck is soon disabled and Max and Furiosa butt heads as to whether or not she is going to allow him to carry on with her and Joe’s 5 wives on board. Though Max proves himself as a force to be reckoned with, and the two rebels band together across an action packed, visually spectacular high-octane thrill ride, fighting of the legions upon legions of Joe’s army while doing so.

To start, I’ll say that this is maybe the best action movie that has come out post-2000 (sorry “The Bourne Trilogy”, this one ups you in every department). It starts off with an absolute chaotic and balls to the wall roller-coaster that grabs a hold of you from its first sequence and doesn’t let up until the end credits role. It’s the greatest example I’ve seen so far of a film’s original creator, taking their original concept and story, and redoing it, the way it should have been done to begin with, for more contemporary audiences who may or may not be familiar with the original trilogy. I haven’t seen a movie with this much energy, this much velocity, and this much non-stop action since Gareth Evans’ “The Raid: Redemption” (2011), a film until seeing this film I would have labeled the best action movie of this century. But this movie goes deeper in that in almost every angle from an action film standpoint. I couldn’t help but think of Steven Spielberg’s “Saving Private Ryan” (1998), and the opening sequence where they storm the beaches of Normandy. Now imagine that level of visceral action and continue it throughout an entire duration of a 2 hour film. It’s a hyperbolic comparison I know. But one that seemed to enter my brain throughout. The film is also perfectly cast – with Hardy playing the epitomized loner. A man whose actions clearly speak louder than his words. Then there’s Theron in a role that puts her in the same echelon as say someone like Sigourney Weaver in the Alien quadrilogy (1979-1992). Bringing a nice blend of post fem attitude along with its several other sub-genres. Resembling something of that of a post-feminist action film, punk-western (and I really have to emphasize the futuristic punk look and vibe of the film), and post-apocalyptic road-rage chase-thriller. Lastly, I should point out its dazzling use of 3D in a film that’s a breathtaking visual splendor, with every burn, crash, and explosions coming off the screen at you. In fact, it’s the best use of the format that I’ve seen since Alfonso Cuaron’s “Gravity (2013) and really deserves to be seen as such, as I can’t imagine it being half the immersive experience it would had I of seen it otherwise. This is about as high-octane and thrilling of an action movie you’re bound to see all year, which also happens to be the very best in what the action genre has produced for us in as far back as I can remember. And one can only imagine that writer/director George Miller is sitting back and marveling at his creation in what can undoubtedly be considered the best in the series of “Mad Max” films to date.

in 3D [A-]

in 2D or any other format you choose to see it in other than the following [>B+]