Review: ‘Rob The Mob’ 9.30.14

 

Every now and then I find myself in the mood for a bit more lighter fare than what I’m normally used to. Since I’m so used to constantly being let down by comedies maybe more than any other genre, I rarely take the leap of faith needed to check one out unless it comes from a recommendation from someone whose opinion I trust. Though with this movie I more or less just came across it. No one told me about it,  I didn’t read anything on it, nor did I see it advertised anywhere. However I did see that it got some fairly decent favorable scores on a couple of movie sites I check out occasionally. So I thought I’d give it a shot. That and I really like Michael Pitt. My first introduction to the talented young actor was in the American version of Michael Haneke’s “Funny Games” (2007) where he did an excellent job playing one of two young men who terrorize an upper class family. He’s gone on to do some strong work in both the TV series “Boardwalk Empire” and played a very small bit part; yet a memorable one, in 2012’s “Seven Psychopaths”. I don’t know if it’s the Leonardo DiCaprio quasi look-alikeness that I like about him or if I geniunely think the guy’s got chops (probably the latter). But really any movie that looks remotely interesting where he’s cast as the lead I will likely check out. Which was the case with this one. Plus, I heard it was a “crime comedy”. So I was hoping for something like Jonathan Demme’s “Married To The Mob” (1988). I also happened to notice comparisons to both “Bonnie and Clyde” and “Goodfellas” on the poster. But knowing very well that those quotes are usually written in hyperbole I still figured oh well what the hell I’ll give it a shot. Hopefully it will surprise me.

It’s a simple enough setup. One that’s based on a true story and took place in New York City in the early 1990’s. We’re first introduced to Tommy (Pitt). Tommy is a degenerate small time crook with a crack cocaine problem who is in love with a girl who more or less is his mirror image. He sticks up small businesses who they themselves hardly make any money for a living. We’re not talking about the sharpest tool in the shed here so it’s only inevitable that he’s going to get caught. And does. The film then cuts to 14 years later when Tommy is released from prison to his girlfriend, who is played suprisingly well by an actress who I hadn’t heard of up to this point named Nina Arianda. These two lovers attempt to “go straight” but because of financial reasons are forced to go back to their old ways. He devises a not so smart idea of robbing the Italian Social Clubs in the city, many of whom have Mob affiliations. After a string of hold-ups, Tommy stumbles upon one club whose boss “Big Al” (played by the always serviceable Andy Garcia) finds out and puts a bounty on his head. Though Tommy comes across something the FBI desperately needs. That and the FBI looks at what Tommy’s doing as what they refer to as a kind of “public service”. The FBI’s “hey better him than us” attitude provides for some pretty solid laughs. Almost as if the FBI gives him free reign to do whatever he wants as long as he’s robbing all of the local town crooks. So in doing so, Tommy begins to misgude both the FBI and the Mob, all while he and his girlfriend start to become almost local celebrities, and attract the attention of a reporter (Ray Romano, who like Garcia, is serviceable in the role). Both entities soon start to tighten up. Especially because the FBI is honing in on Garcia’s character who is a well known big time crime boss. One that in his aging years is trying to go straight and any opposing forces to this will be dealt with accordingly. While Tommy appears to be having a nice run, his time also seems to be running out.

This movie functions fairly well as a whole, even if at times it did feel a bit contrived and cliched. But I think that’s slightly to be expected given a movie like this. The script is mildly clever, and the actors (especially Pitt and in a come out of nowhere and very funny Griffen Dunne) all do a pretty good job in their respective roles. There are quite a few laughs, particularly in the scenes involving Pitt sticking up the Mob. Along with an effective ending that felt like something out of a Hollywood fairy tale that ends tragically. All of these things allow me to give it decent marks. Though as the film develops, specifically near the end, it grows increasingly more and more prepostorous. There’s also that flashback thing movies do only in this case some of it is intertwined with real footage. Making the fake and real flashback scenes slightly difficult to discern from each other. Had they of just left that device out entirely I thought it would have been a lot more effective. But, even still, there’s enough to like here that makes it a worthwhile experience. Especially if you like small, indepedent, charming, lite fair comedies. Just don’t expect anything you’re going to want to write home about.

Grade: B-

 

 

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